What's the best x-ray optic design?

comparing the elliptical monocapillary versus SIGRAY'S new twin paraboloidal X-RAY MIRROR LENS 

Ellipsoidal monocapillary x-ray optic: Single-bounce x-ray optic

Ellipsoidal monocapillary x-ray optic: Single-bounce x-ray optic

Sigray Twin Paraboloidal X-ray Mirror Lens: Two-bounce x-ray optic

Sigray Twin Paraboloidal X-ray Mirror Lens: Two-bounce x-ray optic

Built on developments by Bilderbach et al. at Cornell, ellipsoidal x-ray optics for high resolution laboratory instrumentation use were pioneered by Dr. Wenbing Yun (Sigray's founder) to address the shortcomings of existing monocapillary optics (e.g. tapered and cylindrical optics). These optics are used in the highest resolution x-ray microscopes in the world.

Since then, Dr. Yun and the Sigray R&D team have made breakthrough innovations in x-ray optics technologies in order to produce the twin paraboloidal x-ray mirror lens, with unsurpassed performance capabilities, including:

  • Substantially Higher Flux due to Increased Numerical Aperture: The twin paraboloidal x-ray optics offers considerably increased numerical aperture through the combination of greater acceptance angles and an internal Platinum coating on the reflecting surfaces.
  • Focal Spot at Sub-10 Microns: Advanced proprietary processes enable limited slope errors for extremely fine focusing, with FWHM of <2 µm

  • Minimal aberrations and tails due to uniform magnification path length: As shown in the figure below, a single reflection (such as that of the ellipsoidal monocapillary) will result in different path lengths and thus a spot with tailing abberrations. A mirrored scheme will have a second reflection that compensates for path differences from the first reflection. The path lengths are thus all of uniform length to produce a single, well-defined spot. 

illustrating the effect of the number of bounces on tailing aberrations

Ellipsoidal Monocapillary: Bounces at different portions of the ellipsoid will result in different path lengths (e.g. red and green paths) and therefore a "tailing" aberration at the focal spot

Ellipsoidal Monocapillary: Bounces at different portions of the ellipsoid will result in different path lengths (e.g. red and green paths) and therefore a "tailing" aberration at the focal spot

Sigray Twin Paraboloidal Optic: The mirrored pair compensates for one another, resulting in a uniform path length for all x-rays. This results in a single round spot at the sample without tailing aberrations. 

Sigray Twin Paraboloidal Optic: The mirrored pair compensates for one another, resulting in a uniform path length for all x-rays. This results in a single round spot at the sample without tailing aberrations.